exterminate


exterminate
exterminate, extirpate, eradicate, uproot, deracinate, wipe are comparable when they mean to effect the destruction or abolition of something.
Exterminate implies utter extinction; it therefore usually implies a killing off
{

efforts to exterminate such pests as mosquitoes, rats, and ragweed have been only partly successful

}
{

the tribe had been exterminated, not here in their stronghold, but in their summer camp . . . across the river— Gather

}
Extirpate implies extinction of a group, kind, or growth, but it may carry less an implication of killing off, as exterminate carries, than one of the destruction or removal of the things essential to survival and reproduction; thus, wolves might be exterminated by hunting in a particular area, but large carnivores in general are extirpated by changed conditions in thickly settled regions; a heresy is often extirpated, rather than exterminated, by the removal of the leaders from a position of influence; a vice cannot easily be extirpated so long as the conditions which promote it remain in existence
{

the ancient Athenians had been extirpated by repeated wars and massacres— Graves

}
Eradicate stresses the driving out or elimination of something that has taken root or has established itself
{

diphtheria has been nearly eradicated from the United States

}
{

it is difficult to eradicate popular superstitions

}
{

he must gradually eradicate his settled conviction that the Italians and the French are wrong— Grandgent

}
Uproot differs from eradicate chiefly in being more definitely figurative and in suggesting forcible and violent methods similar to those of a tempest that tears trees out by their roots
{

hands . . . red with guiltless blood . . . uprooting every germ of truth— Shelley

}
{

end forthwith the ruin of a life uprooted thus— Browning

}
{

refugees from the peoples uprooted by war

}
Deracinate basically is very close to uproot
{

disemboweling mountains and deracinating pines— Stevenson

}
{

he fascinated the young Anderson's intellect and deracinated certain convictions— Benét

}
but in much recent use it denotes specifically to separate (as oneself or one's work) from a natural or traditional racial, social, or intellectual group
{

although the author is himself a Negro, his book is . . . deracinated, without any of the lively qualities of the imagination peculiar to his people— Commentary

}
Wipe (in this sense used with out)often implies extermination
{

the entire battery was wiped out by shellfire

}
but it equally often suggests a canceling or obliterating (as by payment, retaliation, or exhaustion of supply)
{

wipe out a debt

}
{

wipe out an old score

}
{

wipe out a disgrace

}
{

the fall in share prices wiped out his margin

}
Analogous words: *abolish, extinguish, annihilate, abate: obliterate, efface, expunge, blot out, *erase: *destroy, demolish, raze

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Exterminate — Ex*ter mi*nate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Exterminated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Exterminating}.] [L. exterminatus, p. p. of exterminare to abolish, destroy, drive out or away; ex out + terminus boundary, limit. See {Term}.] 1. To drive out or away; to expel …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • exterminate — [ek stʉr′mə nāt΄, ikstʉr′mə nāt΄] vt. exterminated, exterminating [< L exterminatus, pp. of exterminare, lit., to drive beyond the boundaries, hence drive out, destroy < ex , out + terminus, boundary: see TERM1] to destroy or get rid of… …   English World dictionary

  • exterminate — index abate (extinguish), abolish, annul, cancel, destroy (efface), dispatch (put to death) …   Law dictionary

  • exterminate — (v.) 1540s, drive away, from L. exterminatus, pp. of exterminare drive out, expel, drive beyond boundaries, also, in L.L. destroy, from phrase ex termine beyond the boundary, from ex out of (see EX (Cf. ex )) + termine, abl. of termen boundary,… …   Etymology dictionary

  • exterminate — [v] kill abolish, annihilate, blot out*, decimate, destroy, do away with*, eliminate, eradicate, erase, execute, extinguish, extirpate, finish off, massacre, obliterate, put an end to*, rub out*, send to kingdom come*, slaughter, stamp out*, wipe …   New thesaurus

  • exterminate — ► VERB ▪ destroy completely; eradicate. DERIVATIVES extermination noun exterminator noun exterminatory adjective. ORIGIN originally in the sense «drive out»: from Latin exterminare, from terminus boundary …   English terms dictionary

  • exterminate — transitive verb ( nated; nating) Etymology: Latin exterminatus, past participle of exterminare, from ex + terminus boundary more at term Date: 1591 to get rid of completely usually by killing off < exterminate termites and cockroaches > •… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • exterminate — exterminable /ik sterr meuh neuh beuhl/, adj. extermination, n. /ik sterr meuh nayt /, v.t., exterminated, exterminating. to get rid of by destroying; destroy totally; extirpate: to exterminate an enemy; to exterminate insects. [1535 45; < L… …   Universalium

  • exterminate — verb /ikˈstɜrmɪˌneɪt/ a) To kill all of a population, usually deliberate and especially applied to pests. Well use poison to exterminate the rats. b) To bring a definite end to, finish completely. A rather strong word that implies that what has… …   Wiktionary

  • exterminate — [[t]ɪkstɜ͟ː(r)mɪneɪt[/t]] exterminates, exterminating, exterminated VERB To exterminate a group of people or animals means to kill all of them. [V n] A huge effort was made to exterminate the rats... [V n] They have a real fear that they ll be… …   English dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.